1
Dec
2015

Sylvia Chivaratanond named the first Suzanne Deal Booth Adjunct Curator of American Art

The Centre Pompidou Foundation is pleased to announce the appointment of Sylvia Chivaratanond as the first Suzanne Deal Booth Adjunct Curator of American Art for the Centre Pompidou and the Centre Pompidou Foundation.  In her new role, Ms. Chivaratanond will work closely with members of the Centre Pompidou Foundation and the Centre Pompidou in Paris to develop and support their expanding programs of acquiring and seeking donations of American art. Art historian, independent curator and critic Ms. Chivaratanond holds art history degrees from Leicester University and UCLA.  Her notable curatorial projects include exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Tate Gallery in London and the 2003 Venice Biennale. Over the past ten years she has overseen exhibitions and publications with contemporary artists including Dan Graham, Cady Noland, Christian Marclay, Isaac Julien, Robert Gober, Matthew Barney, Catherine Opie, Ed Ruscha, Sturtevant, James Lee Byars, and Bas Jan Ader. Read more 
12
Nov
2015

Twilight Epiphany: A Retrospective

James Turrell’s “Twilight Epiphany” at Rice University is the 73rd Skyspace the artist created, but the pavilion has a little-known predecessor that would have been the very first of Turrell’s signature series. Turrell does not draw, paint or sculpt, at least, not in the traditional senses of the terms; he creates with light. As he has put it, “I make spaces that apprehend light for our perception, and in some ways gather it, or seem to hold it…my work is more about your seeing than it is about my seeing, although it is a product of my seeing.” Using light, color theory, and the manipulation of space, Turrell often creates areas that inspire quiet meditation (rooted in his Quaker upbringing) and play tricks on our eyes. Read more 
13
Feb
2015

Sight and Sound

Architecture is frozen music, and music is liquid architecture, or so said the poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. It’s hard not to see the truth in those analogies at artist James Turrell’s “Twilight Epiphany” Skyspace.

Its 72-foot-square white roof seems to float above a grassy hill that calls to mind a low-slung Mayan temple. Inside the berm, a cozy room lined with pink granite benches invites visitors to ponder the heavens through an opening, or aperture, in the ceiling. The whole effect is best experienced in the morning or evening twilight. That’s when an LED-light sequence created by Turrell projects colorful hues onto the ceiling, dragging the sky to earth. The goal, in Turrell’s own words, is “to create an experience of wordless thought.”

Click here to read the article in the Rice Magazine >